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Court Says Conviction for Evading Arrest in Texas Is Not Categorically a Crime Involving Moral Turpitude

The Fifth Circuit vacated the BIA’s decision and remanded, holding that the petitioner’s conviction for evading arrest under Texas Penal Code §38.04 was not categorically a crime involving moral turpitude rendering him ineligible for cancellation of removal under INA §240A(b)(1).

CA9 Says Fleeing from Police Under California Vehicle Code §2800.2 Is Not Categorically a CIMT

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granted the petition for review of the Board of Immigration Appeals’ decision and held that the petitioner’s conviction for fleeing from a police officer under California Vehicle Code §2800.2 was not categorically a crime involving moral turpitude (CIMT), because the conduct criminalized does not necessarily create the risk of harm that characterizes a CIMT. The court concluded by ruling that the petitioner was not statutorily ineligible for cancellation of removal.

Sexual violation case ruled upon

A sexual offense in violation of a statute enacted to protect children is a crime involving moral turpitude where the victim is particularly young—that is, under 14 years of age—or is under 16 and the age differential between the perpetrator and victim is significant, or both, even though the statute requires no culpable mental state as to the age of the child. Matter of Silva-Trevino, 26 I&N Dec. 826 (BIA 2016), clarified.

BIA Says Arizona Felony Conviction for Solicitation to Possess Marijuana for Sale Is a CIMT

In a precedent decision issued today, the BIA clarified Matter of Vo, holding that, within the jurisdiction of the Ninth Circuit, a returning lawful permanent resident (LPR) who has a felony conviction for solicitation to possess marijuana for sale is an arriving alien who is inadmissible under INA §212(a)(2)(A)(i)(I) for having committed a crime of moral turpitude (CIMT), even though that section of the INA refers only to attempt and conspiracy to commit a CIMT.

Fraud Waiver does NOT Waive CMT

Matter of TIMA, 26 I&N Dec. 839 (BIA 2016)
A fraud waiver under section 237(a)(1)(H) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1227(a)(1)(H) (2012), cannot waive an alien’s removability under section 237(a)(2)(A)(i) for having been convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude, even if the conviction is based on the underlying fraud.

Court Says Vehicle Theft Under California Law Is Not a CIMT

The Ninth Circuit granted the petition for review of the BIA’s precedent decision in Matter of Almanza-Arenas, which held that a conviction for vehicle theft under California Vehicle Code §10851(a) constitutes a crime involving moral turpitude (CIMT). The court remanded to the BIA, holding that, because the least of the acts criminalized under §10851(a) is a temporary taking, the statute is overbroad and thus not categorically a CIMT. The court also found that §10851(a) is an indivisible statute under Descamps v. United States.

Identity theft ruled NOT to be CIMT

The Ninth Circuit granted the petitioners’ petitions for review, holding that the BIA erred in finding that their convictions for identity theft under California Penal Code §§530.5(a) and (d)(2) were categorically crimes involving moral turpitude, because violations of those subsections do not constitute fraud-based crimes, nor do they necessarily involve vile, base, or depraved conduct.

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