Some information on the E-2

If you are petitioning to get an E-2 Employee, there might only be a 3 month, or 6 month or 1 year limitation. It will depend on the Consulate. Some might even go as far as 5 years.

You might get some visitors from Immigration to make sure the business is real.

Substantive changes must have an amendment filed in order so that you will not be out of status. It must be filed at the California Service Center.

 

Committing fraud may deny AOS

The Eighth Circuit denied the petition for review of the denial of the Tanzanian petitioner’s adjustment application, upholding the BIA’s finding that the petitioner intended to falsely represent himself as a U.S. citizen on his I-9 employment eligibility verification form. The court further found that this action constituted a non-waivable violation under INA §212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(I). In addition, the court held that the proceedings were not closed when the IJ admitted the petitioner’s I-9, and that the form’s admission did not violate the petitioner’s due process rights.

Need to take Biometrics Overseas?

As noted on the newly created web pages for individual USCIS International Operations (USCIS IO) field offices, USCIS has confirmed that it will now permit biometrics to be collected abroad in certain “rare” and compelling circumstances.

PERM Audit

A scary fact:

 

Approximately 30 percent of all PERM cases are audited, and half of those cases are denied.

 

Therefore, make certain it is done right.

The Petty Offense Exception

Question: I committed a relatively small crime. Am I now not admissible to the U.S.?

Answer: It will depend on what exactly you committed. However, there is what is known as the petty offense exception.

Question: What is the petty offense exemption?

Answer: An alien (whether or not a minor) is not inadmissible if the CIMT is for a petty offense. A conviction (or admission) is considered a petty offense: “if the maximum penalty possible for the crime of which the alien was convicted … did not exceed imprisonment for one year and, if the alien was convicted of such crime, the alien was not sentenced to a term of imprisonment in excess of 6 months (regardless of the extent to which the sentence was ultimately executed).

Question: What if there is an undeterminate probationary period?

Answer: An undesignated probationary sentence, unlike an indeterminate sentence, is not considered a felony punishable by more than one year imprisonment, where the court has designated it a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of 6 months.

Question: What if the crime is a ‘wobbler’?

Answer: Cal. Penal Code §487.2 is a “wobbler” statute and where judge designates it as a misdemeanor, the BIA is bound by that determination for purposes of the petty offense exception. You need to look at each particular State.

Question: What if I had a drug conviction?

Answer: Department of State takes the position that the petty offense exception is not applicable to drug cases.

Question: What if I committed or admitted to more than 1 petty offense?

Answer: The petty offense exception is not applicable if more than one CIMT offense has been committed or admitted.

Question: What if I committed more than 1 crime, but only 1 is a CIMT?

Answer: Where there was a second CIMT, the “stop-time” rule applied because the petty offense exception only applies to the first CIMT. However, it remains effective where one of the 2 offenses was not for a CIMT. For example, an applicant who was convicted of a petty offense that was a CIMT and a second offense (battery) that was not a CIMT, he is not barred from cancellation, because he has not been convicted of an offense under §212(a)(2). It also remains effective for purposes of cancellation, where the second CIMT was not committed until after the residency requirement had accrued. The “stop-time” rule did not bar cancellation where first conviction was a petty offense and second conviction occurred after respondent accrued 7 years of continuous residence.

Question: What if I admit the facts of a particular crime?

Answer: If there was no conviction but the person admits facts, the petty offense exception applies and the alien is not inadmissible so long as the maximum sentence that could have been imposed does not exceed one year.

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Indictment of an Immigration Attorney

ICE press release announcing the indictment of an immigration attorney, Parmesh N. Dixit, of Alpharetta, Georgia, on charges of visa fraud, conspiracy, and harboring undocumented individuals for the purpose of private financial gain.

Porting to a new Job?

The Second Circuit vacated the judgment of the district court and remanded, holding that USCIS is required by the INA’s portability provisions to give pre-revocation notice to the beneficiary or to the successor employer that it is revoking an I-140 petition filed by a previous employer.

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