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Trump May Slash Number of Refugees U.S. Accepts by 40 Percent

the White House is considering a second major reduction in the number of refugees accepted for resettlement in the United States. Last year, the Trump administration set the cap for refugee admissions at a historic low of 45,000. President Trump must officially set the cap by the start of FY2019, which begins on October 1, 2018

Circuit Court Affirms Injunction Against Indiana’s Attempt to Withhold Funds to Agency That Resettles Syrian Refugees

The Seventh Circuit affirmed the grant of a preliminary injunction against the state of Indiana’s attempt to withhold funds from a private agency that assists in the resettlement of refugees, including Syrian refugees. The court rejected the governor of Indiana’s brief asserting that “the State’s compelling interest in protecting its residents from the well-documented threat of terrorists posing as refugees to gain entry into Western countries,” finding that there was no evidence to support that argument.

Washington Post: Little-Known Immigration Program Seeks to Reunite Central American Families Residing in the U.S.

The Washington Post reports on the Central American Minors Refugee/Parole Program, a new but little-known program that allows Central American immigrants who reside legally in the United States to bring family members to the country. The article states that the new policy applies to children from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador who face harm from violence and other dangers. Admission is also possible for spouses and grandchildren of immigrants in some cases.

Federal Agency Says Telephone Scams Target Refugees

Press release from HHS Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) says that there are reports of refugee families victimized by the recent telephone scam targeting Bhutanese refugees have come in from Texas, Washington State, Colorado, Illinois, Pennsylvania, and Nebraska.

What will be expected of me as a new arrival?

Americans value hard work and initiative. You should try to get a job as quickly as possible. Many refugees’ families like many American families find that both husband and wife must work. Lack of English language skill will not prevent you from getting a job, but it may limit the kind of job you can get when you first arrive. Changing jobs is common as English language and job skills improve. Many new arrivals study part-time to improve their English language and job skills while they work. Resettlement agencies can help identify appropriate programs.

Successful resettlement depends on a refugee’s ability and willingness to adapt to the new environment. Cooperation with the resettlement agency can be key to a successful transition. Be realistic, but be optimistic. More than two million refugees have resettled in the U.S. in the past two decades. The vast majority have made the transition to life in the U.S. and have become valued members of American society. Others have benefited from the refuge offered by the U.S. until conditions in their homelands changed and they were able to return to their homes.

Because the United States is so diverse, generalizing about what to expect is difficult. You may have heard stories from friends or relatives who have recently resettled in the United States. Remember that every resettled refugee has a different experience. Seek information from a variety of sources.

Resettlement is not a decision to be made lightly. It may mean that you cannot return to your home country for many years. It may result in permanent separation from friends and relatives. But, it may also be the beginning of a new life and new opportunities.

What can I expect if I am resettled in the United States?

 The United States is a land of great diversity. Refugees may be resettled in small towns or big cities. If you have a close relative already in the U.S., you will probably be resettled where they live. If you do not, a resettlement agency will decide the best place for you based on the availability of jobs and services. Refugees are expected to go to the assigned site and remain there during their initial resettlement.

The resettlement agency, often called the “sponsor,” is the most important source of information and assistance during the first months of adjustment to life in the U.S. An agency representative will meet you at the airport, arrange for housing, and prepare a resettlement plan that includes initial contact with governmental services and employment agencies. If you are approved and you do not have a sponsor in the U.S., sponsorship will be arranged.

In order to retain your refugee status in the U.S., you may not travel outside of the U.S. unless you first obtain permission to return before your travel. If you choose to travel, you should first contact the nearest BCIS office for the appropriate forms to request for permission to reenter the

The United States is a land of great diversity. Refugees may be resettled in small towns or big cities. If you have a close relative already in the U.S., you will probably be resettled where they live. If you do not, a resettlement agency will decide the best place for you based on the availability of jobs and services. Refugees are expected to go to the assigned site and remain there during their initial resettlement.

The resettlement agency, often called the “sponsor,” is the most important source of information and assistance during the first months of adjustment to life in the U.S. An agency representative will meet you at the airport, arrange for housing, and prepare a resettlement plan that includes initial contact with governmental services and employment agencies. If you are approved and you do not have a sponsor in the U.S., sponsorship will be arranged.

In order to retain your refugee status in the U.S., you may not travel outside of the U.S. unless you first obtain permission to return before your travel. If you choose to travel, you should first contact the nearest BCIS office for the appropriate forms to request for permission to reenter the

New update to be released regarding a Refugee Placement Program from countries such Haiti

To control the influx of refugees from such countries as Haiti the DOS Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration Eric Schwartz released an update on the Reception and Placement Program for newly arriving refugees.

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