• Hours & Info

    (562) 495-0554
    M-F: 8:00am - 6:00 p.m.
    Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
  • Social

  • Past Blog Posts

Question: I have won asylum as of about two years ago. Is there anything I need to do?

Answer: If you have come to the U.S. as a refugee or been granted asylum in the U.S. — whether from the Asylum Office of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services or by an Immigration Judge in court — you are now allowed to live in the U.S., accept U.S. employment, and travel and return (with a refugee travel document in place of a passport).

Additional rights will become yours with time, such as that to apply for a U.S. green card after one year, and to apply for U.S. citizenship four years after that. Learn more about how to protect and make the best use of your refugee or asylum status here. However, you MUST apply for the Green Card after the one year grant. It is not automatic and will not happen unless you apply.

Question: Can I bring my spouse and children into the U.S. now?

Answer: Once you have been granted asylum, your immediate family members (spouse and children)—whether they are in the U.S. or outside—are entitled to a “derivative” grant of asylum. If your spouse and children were included in your asylum application and are physically present in the U.S., they will automatically receive asylum at the same time as you.
If they are overseas, or were not included in your application, you can file USCIS Form I-730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition to obtain asylum for them. Use a separate form for each family member.

For your spouse to be eligible for asylum, the two of you must have been legally married (that is, with a government-issued certificate) before you were granted asylum. For your children to be eligible, they must be unmarried and younger than 21. Thereafter, once you qualify for the Green Card or residency, they will as well.

Court Affirms Preliminary Injunction Requiring IJs to Consider a Detainee’s Financial Ability to Pay When Setting a Bond

The Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s order granting a preliminary injunction in favor of the plaintiffs, a class of noncitizens in removal proceedings who are detained under INA §236(a) in the Central District of California and are unable to afford the amount of bond set by immigration officials. Finding that the plaintiffs were likely to succeed on the merits of their due process claim, the court held that the district court did not abuse its discretion in granting a preliminary injunction requiring immigration officials when making bond determinations to, among other things, consider (1) financial ability to obtain bond and (2) alternative conditions of release.

DOL Announces Changes to Its iCERT System for H-2A and H-2B Programs

For FY2017, more than 83 percent of H-2A applications and approximately 94 percent of H-2B applications were submitted electronically through the iCERT System with very little system disruption during the peak filing season. In an effort to provide better service and ensure more complete H-2A and H-2B applications are submitted for review, DOL’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification (OFLC) will release new enhancements to the iCERT System on or about October 10, 2017.

BIA Remands to Determine If Beneficiary’s Birth Certificate Is Sufficient

In a precedent decision issued on September 20, 2017, the BIA held that where a petitioner seeking to prove a familial relationship submits a birth certificate that was not registered contemporaneously with the birth, an adjudicator must consider the birth certificate, as well as all the other evidence of record and the circumstances of the case, to determine whether the petitioner has submitted sufficient reliable evidence to demonstrate the claimed relationship by a preponderance of the evidence.

Court Finds Petitioner’s Failure to Brief Her Ineffective Assistance of Counsel Claim Constituted Waiver of the Claim

According Chevron deference to the BIA’s decision, the Fifth Circuit held that the BIA did not err in denying the petitioner’s motion to reconsider her motion to reopen and found that the petitioner had waived her ineffective assistance of counsel claim by failing to brief the issue on appeal.

New York Times: As DACA Negotiations Drag on, a Judge in Brooklyn Could Intervene

The New York Times reports that President Trump’s laundry list of immigration demands threw a wrench into the fraught negotiations over finding a legislative solution to provide permanent protection for Dreamers. But if the Washington deal-making drags on too long, it could be disrupted by a different force: a federal judge in Brooklyn. Having found himself in a position to guide DACA’s fate because two linked lawsuits have landed in his courtroom, Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis has sternly warned policymakers that should they prove unable to repair the DACA program, he might have to step in.

USCIS Changes to Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-129 Petitions

On October 12, 2017, USCIS changed the direct filing addresses for petitioners of Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker. Petitioners must now file Form I-129 according to the state where the company or organization’s primary office is located. In addition, petitioners located in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas must now file Form I-129 at the California Service Center. As of November 11, 2017, USCIS may reject forms filed at wrong service centers.

%d bloggers like this: