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Revision to Reciprocity Schedule for E Visas for French Citizens

Effective August 29, 2019, the reciprocity schedule for France will be revised for both E‑1 and E‑2 visas. According to the U.S. Embassy in Paris, this change is being made on a reciprocal basis commensurate with the treatment by the government of France afforded to U.S. citizens applying for similar visas.

Another win for the Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner POST WEDNESDAY

After having his E-2 visa application denied by the Consulate in Canada, our client retained us to file a new application and a few months later, his application was approved, allowing him to enter the U.S. as the owner of two day-care centers in Florida.

Another Win for the Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner

E-2 granted for Client, her husband and children, based on investment in the United States in an entertainment concert staging and equipment services company.

USCIS Announces that Certain New Zealand Nationals Are Now Eligible for E-1 and E-2 Nonimmigrant Classifications

USCIS announced that starting yesterday, June 10, 2019, certain New Zealand nationals can request a change of status to the E‑1 nonimmigrant trader classification and the E‑2 nonimmigrant investor classification under Public Law 115-226.

USCIS Announces Israeli Nationals Eligible for Treaty Investor Visas

USCIS announced that beginning May 1, 2019, certain Israeli nationals who are lawfully present in the United States will be able to request a change of status to the E‑2 treaty investor classification.

Want an E-2? Here are some issues? Want an E-2 Visa? Look at these issues.

Question: I want to open up my own company. Can you you let me know some specifics. For example, I have a friend from Iran. Can he get an E1 or E2? As for E-2’s, Iranians can apply for E-2’s anywhere.

Question: Are there any restrictions where the money comes from for the investment?

Answer: Normally, not. However, keep in mind that there are two\ Russian Banks under US Sanctions. Thus, \make sure money does not come from these banks.

Question: What percentage of ownership do I need to have in the company?

Answer: Make sure there is at least a 50% ownership by treaty countries. It is even better if there is a 51% ownership.

Question: What if I renounce my nationality?

Answer: If the principal owner renounces nationality, then the E-2 is gone.

Question: What is there is a merger or acquisition?

Answer: Sometimes merges and acquisitions changes the 50% ownership. If this is the case, then there will no longer be E-2 qualification.

Question: What about employees I need from my home country?

Answer: For employees coming over, you need to still  make sure that the main investor gets an E2.  The E-2 specialized knowledge employee will differ with the particular Consulate. Some require 2 years actual experience. The consular officer might say that he or she will give just 2 years and that an American is needed afterwards.

Question: What about my spouse and children in my home country?

Answer: An E-2 change of status for you which is approved, will NOT allow E-2 derivatives to get a  visa at the consulate. Rather, you need to consulate process with your E-2.

Question: How long will I get?

Answer: E-2’s always are now given for 2 years in US., even if the  visa is issued for 5 years. However, you can go out 1 week before expiration of visa, and come back with 2 year stamp.

Question: Will the amount of the investment differ?

Should I apply for the E-2 or L-1 Business Visa?

 

Question: I have a business and want to either purchase or buy a business in the U.S. but do not know which one of the visas would be better. The choices that I have been given are the E-2 and the L-1. Can you clarify and/or help me make the decision?

 

Answer: Each visa has its advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the E-2 will be better for somebody, while for another person, the L-1 might be better.   First, you must determine if you are from a country which has a treaty with the United States. Without a treaty, you cannot get the E-2. This would mean that for sure you are required and can only get the L-1.

 

Next, we need to determine if you have a business in your foreign country and whether you have been running the business for at least one year. Without a business, you cannot apply for the L-1 as that is a basic requirement for doing the L-1.

 

Question: How much do I have to invest for each one?

 

Answer: The E-2 generally requires around $75,000 to $100,000 U.S. investment. The L-1 is actually requires much less money. Many L-1’s can do an investment with only $20,000 U.S. Thus, if you do not have the necessary amount of money to invest in the business, then it would be the L-1 that you would apply and not the E-2.

 

Question: Can I just transfer money to my U.S. bank account  and will that be considered an investment?

 

Answer: No. That is just a transfer of money. You can get that money out anytime you want. An investment actually puts the money at risk where you cannot simply withdraw it anytime you like. Thus, if the business you want to begin in the U.S. is one that requires very little investment, or requires only a computer and online work, then the E-2 will not work. It would be better to do the L-1.

 

Question: Speaking of computer work, can I just use a room in my house I will rent there, or the garage for the work?

 

Answer: No. You must have a real ‘brick & mortar’ office. You can certainly rent an inexpensive office that shares the conference room, waiting area and kitchen will other tenants, but you must have a real office in order to have any hope of getting the E-2 or L-1 approved.

 

Question: Where do I file the E-2 or L-1?

 

Answer: The E-2 can be filed directly at the U.S. Consulate. You do not need prior U.S. Immigration approval. Thus, the filing fees, time for approval and review are generally less than with an L-1. The L-1 must get prior U.S. Immigration approval at USCIS. You could file by premium processing with will take much less time, but still it must be filed in the U.S. Once approved, it will be transferred to the Consulate upon which you are going to apply for the actual Visa. Of course, you could also do a change of status to E-2 or L-1 inside the U.S. However, once you leave, you will still need consular approval to re-enter the U.S.

 

 

 

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