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Iranian nationals are no longer eligible for E-1 and E-2 visas

USCIS announced on January 22 that Iranian nationals are no longer eligible for E-1 and E-2 trade and investor visas. This is because the Trump administration terminated the 1955 Treaty of Amity, Economic Relations, and Consular Rights with Iran in 2018. Current Iranian holders of these visas may stay until their visas expire, but may not extend or reapply for the visas. USCIS will also send out notices of Intent to Deny to all Iranian nationals who applied for E-1 and E-2 visas after October 3, 2018.

Revision to Reciprocity Schedule for E Visas for French Citizens

Effective August 29, 2019, the reciprocity schedule for France will be revised for both E‑1 and E‑2 visas. According to the U.S. Embassy in Paris, this change is being made on a reciprocal basis commensurate with the treatment by the government of France afforded to U.S. citizens applying for similar visas.

Another win for the Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner POST WEDNESDAY

After having his E-2 visa application denied by the Consulate in Canada, our client retained us to file a new application and a few months later, his application was approved, allowing him to enter the U.S. as the owner of two day-care centers in Florida.

Another Win for the Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner

E-2 granted for Client, her husband and children, based on investment in the United States in an entertainment concert staging and equipment services company.

USCIS Announces that Certain New Zealand Nationals Are Now Eligible for E-1 and E-2 Nonimmigrant Classifications

USCIS announced that starting yesterday, June 10, 2019, certain New Zealand nationals can request a change of status to the E‑1 nonimmigrant trader classification and the E‑2 nonimmigrant investor classification under Public Law 115-226.

USCIS Announces Israeli Nationals Eligible for Treaty Investor Visas

USCIS announced that beginning May 1, 2019, certain Israeli nationals who are lawfully present in the United States will be able to request a change of status to the E‑2 treaty investor classification.

What if I have money to invest in my own business, but not from a ‘Treaty Country’ to get the E-2? Not from a Treaty Country? Try the L-1 and then the Multinational Visa Petition.

Question: I wanted to start my own business in the U.S. and in fact have sufficient money. However, I was told that I am not able to do so because I am not a citizen of a ‘treaty country’. Is there anything else I can do?

Answer: Yes, you can try the L-1A which actually requires considerably less money. You will have to either have your own company, or start a company in your home country.

Question: What is the L-1A?

Answer: The L-1A nonimmigrant classification enables a U.S. employer to transfer an executive or manager from one of its affiliated foreign offices to one of its offices in the United States. The L-1A intra-company transferee classification applies to qualified executives and managers within multinational companies. These individuals can be transferred from their foreign employer to work for up to seven years in the United States for an appropriately affiliated U.S. company.

Question: What if I am not a manger? Is there another type of L-1?

Answer: Yes.  The L1B intracompany transferee classification applies to qualified specialized knowledge employees. Such individuals may be transferred from their foreign employer to work for up to five years in the U.S. for an appropriately affiliated U.S. company.

Question: What is the difference between the L-1A and the H-1?

Answer: Many employers in the United States routinely need temporary workers that are highly skilled. Therefore, there are various temporary work visas such as H1B and L1 (L1A and L1B) that allow the employers to hire foreign foreign workers.

Question: Can somebody on the L-1 apply later for the Green Card?

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