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Get Ready! Prosecutorial Discretions are being Revoked.

Question: I was in Immigration Court about 2 years ago and had no relief. However, I did not have any crimes either and my attorney made a motion for prosecutorial discretion. However, last week, I was arrested for DUI. I did not even have to plea as the case was dismissed. There was no evidence and I have no conviction. However, the arrest prompted ICE to revoke my Prosecutorial Discretion. What happens now?

Answer: Under U.S. immigration law, prosecutorial discretion (PD) refers to the power that ICE has to discontinue working on a deportation case. ICE can exercise its PD in many different ways. For example, ICE can join you in asking an immigration judge to close your case. Prosecutorial discretion used to be under Obama one of the most important aspects of Immigration Law. Immigration Prosecutors can choose not to prosecute a crime for which someone is arrested. They can decide to pursue less serious charges. They can basically decide not to issue the Notice to Appear and begin Removal Proceedings.

However, under Trump, this has changed. Prosecutorial Discretion is all but dead. It is very rarely being issued. There are, of course, situations where it is still merited, but nothing like before. Additionally, ICE is revoking grants of PD left and right. Therefore, it becomes necessary for you to know your rights.

You do not have to sign a voluntary deportation;
You can fight your case in front of the Immigration Judge; and
You can still get detained;
You can make a motion to get bonded out.

Therefore, you will note that ICE officials in many cases will not tell you the truth and will lie about what you can and cannot do. You MUST know that you can fight your case and the fact that the Prosecutorial Discretion was denied and/or revoked is no reason to give up. It just means you must fight your case now.

Question: But how can I fight? What should I do?

Answer: First, get a qualified Immigration Attorney. Each case is different. This means that depending on your situation, the particular forms of relief will be different. We might be able to apply for Cancellation of Removal or Adjustment of Status, or Waivers of a variety of different kinds, or Asylum, Withholding of Removal, Convention Against Torture or a number of other forms of relief. What is important is that you can fight your case. Simply because Trump has decided to issue orders revoking Prosecutorial Discretion does not mean your path has ended.

Immigration Attorneys across the country are fighting every order that Trump makes. He cannot simply make the Immigration and Nationality Act disappear, or the Code of Federal Regulations, or the Policy Memos or the Foreign Affairs Manual. We are a country of Laws and one man, even if President of the U.S., cannot simply dictate and make all of that disappear.

We are fighting one case at a time and ultimately, we will prevail and the tides will turn. Trump is already seeing through his Muslim Ban, that he cannot simply sign a paper and think it becomes law.

 

 

If your in deportation, get a deportation attorney

 

A deportation lawyer, Brian D. Lerner, explains how just being deportable in the U.S. does not mean you cannot win your case. First, the deportation attorney explains there are two forms of Cancellation of Removal. Of course, you must be in Removal Proceedings to apply for Cancellation of Removal and cannot apply outside of Removal Proceedings. Deportation Lawyers generally state that many times  clients come into their offices claiming they have been here for  over 10 years and they want the deportation attorney to get their Green Card for them. However, it is not that easy as most deportation lawyers will know. These people have the misunderstanding that they only need to be here 10 years and magically they will qualify for the  Green Card. The deportation attorney also states that many times people who already have their Green Cards (or Lawful Permanent Residency), that they cannot be kicked out of the U.S. or deported. That is not further from the truth explains deportation lawyers. In fact there are multiple grounds of inadmissibility explains the deportation attorney . Brian D. Lerner, deportation lawyer further explains that by having the Green Card, you still fall under multiple provisions of the Immigration and Nationality act and you can absolutely be removed from the United States and deported with your status and Green Card taken away from you.

 

Additionally, deportation attorneys gets many clients that say they committed a crime, but they served their time and therefore is it not double jeopardy and/or a violation of their constitutional rights to be put into deportation / removal proceedings for the same crime. Brian D. Lerner, deportation lawyer states unequivocally that it is not a violation of your due process rights and it is not double jeopardy to be deported or put into immigration court for that same crime. Deportation lawyers explains that it is the criminal law that controls when you get or do the crime. However, U.S. immigration law controls once you are released from prison or once you have plead and have the conviction explains deportation attorneys. Therefore, the deportation attorney  explains that you might have had your Green Card for 10-15 years and have committed a crime which lands you in deportation proceedings. You can then be deported back to your country for that crime.

 

Thus, the Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, deportation attorney explains how it is possible to beat the deportation and keep your Green Card. There is what is known as Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents. If you have your Green Card and commit or have committed a crime, then you might fall under the provisions of Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents. What are the requirements inquires the deportation lawyer? The deportation attorney , Brian D. Lerner, explains that first you need to have the Green Card for about 7 years. Next, you must not have committed an aggravated felony and finally it is within the discretion of the Immigration Judge whether to grant or not grant this petition.

 

Watch a video of Brian D. Lerner, deportation lawyer explaining how to win a Cancellation of Removal Case

 

The second issue is of notable concern. The deportation attorney explains that there are many types of crimes that fall under the ambit of being an aggravated felony. In fact, if you are about to plead guilty to a particular crime, you might very well want to visit a deportation attorney to get a criminal evaluation to work with the criminal attorney to plead to something that might minimize your immigration consequences and/or make it so you are not an aggravated felon. Brian D. Lerner, deportation attorney, will then argue how the crime is not an aggravated felony and then proceed to prepare what is necessary to represent you in your removal proceeding. Remember, this form of Cancellation of Removal is only for persons who have their Green Cards, not those here illegally.  Thus, deportation lawyers explains that it is a matter of preparing a very detailed and generally large petition for Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents. This will include all kinds of hardship, equities, declarations, exhibits and other matters to show why the Immigration Judge should grant the Cancellation of Removal. The deportation attorney los Angeles explains how if the Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents is granted, then you will retain and keep your Green Card. It is basically like a get out of jail free card from the Monopoly game.

 

Brian D. Lerner, deportation lawyer goes on to state that at the trial, he will call witnesses and sometimes get expert testimony on different areas of the case. Brian Lerner, deportation attorney  will then also get a psychological hardship report for the different family members. Sometimes, deportation attorneys will get evidence to show rehabilitation, volunteer work, family ties and other equities so the Immigration will agree to give the person their Green Cards and to be able to stay in the United States.

 

Thus, while people may think the moment they get into deportation proceedings is the end of the road, it is not. Deportation attorneys show how experience and putting together a good case can get somebody to stay in the U.S. even after being ordered removable, after committing a crime and after serving time. It is the view of Brian D. Lerner, deportation attorney, to vigorously represent his clients. He believes that the criminal client already served their time and understands that many people do ‘dumb’ things when they were young. Also, many people are in the wrong place at the wrong time and afraid to fight the legal system or simply don’t have the money to defend. Deportation lawyers makes clear that many clients have been in the U.S. for many years and have families and nothing back in their home countries. Brian D. Lerner, deportation lawyer, explains that it would tear the family apart, hurt the children, make a past mistake ruin the current life. Therefore, it is critical that you not give up. Fight your case and get a good deportation Attorney.

Got Voluntary Departure? Case just ruled it does NOT break continuous presence for Cancellation

Matter of CASTREJON-COLINO, 26 I&N Dec. 667 (BIA 2015)
(1) Where an alien has the right to a hearing before an Immigration Judge, a voluntary departure or return does not break the alien’s continuous physical presence for purposes of cancellation of removal under section 240A(b)(1)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1229b(b)(1)(A) (2012), in the absence of evidence that he or she was informed of and waived the right to such a hearing. Matter of Avilez, 23 I&N Dec. 799 (BIA 2005), clarified.
(2) Evidence that an alien who had the right to a hearing before an Immigration Judge was fingerprinted and/or photographed before being allowed to voluntarily depart is not enough, in itself, to demonstrate a waiver of the right to a hearing or to show a process of sufficient formality to break continuous physical presence.

What is a ‘controlled substance’ for removal purposes

Supreme Court Holds That Only Substances Defined as “Controlled” Under §802 Trigger Removal

The Supreme Court reversed the Eighth Circuit, finding that INA §237(a)(2)(B)(i) triggers removal only when the government can prove a connection between an element of an immigrant’s drug conviction and a “controlled substance” as defined in 21 USC §802.

What is Immigration Law

Prosecutorial Discretion: How to avoid deportation

Prosecutorial Discretion: A tool to Avoid Deportation

Question: I got into a minor criminal situation and now I am very afraid that I will be placed into deportation proceedings. What can I do?

Answer: There are several forms of relief that you might be eligible for in proceedings. However, one very effective tool that I would look into would be known as Prosecutorial Discretion.

Question: What is Prosecutorial Discretion?

Answer: Prosecutorial Discretion can be used in a variety of different situations. Some examples would include: deciding to issue or cancel a notice of detainer; deciding to issue, reissue, serve, file, or cancel a Notice to Appear(NTA); focusing enforcement resources on particular administrative violations or conduct; deciding whom to stop, question, or arrest for an administrative violation; deciding whom to detain or to release on bond, supervision, personal recognizance, or seeking expedited removal orother forms of removal by means other than a formal removal proceeding in immigration court.

Question: What happens if the Prosecutorial Discretion is granted? What would I get?

Answer: Some will depend upon what exactly you are asking for and where in the proceedings you are. However, generally, if granted, Prosecutorial Discretion can stop a deportation/removal proceeding, or can keep one from being filed in the first place, or can reopen a removal order already issued. It can settle or dismiss a proceeding; grant a deferred action, grant parole, or staying a final order of removal; or it can respond to or join in a motion to reopen removal proceedings and to consider joining in a motion to grant relief or a benefit.

Question: What factors are considered when deciding on whether to grant a request for Prosecutorial Discretion?

Answer: There are a lot of different items that are considered. They are as follows:

– the agency’s civil immigration enforcement priorities;
the person’s length of presence in the United States, with particular consideration given
to presence while in lawful status;
the circumstances of the person’s arrival in the United States and the manner of his or her
entry,particularly if the alien came to the United States as a young child;
the person’s pursuit of education in the United States, with particular consideration given to those who have graduated from a U.S. high school or have successfully pursued or are
pursuing a college or advanced degrees at a legitimate institution of higher education in
the United States;
whether the person, or the person’s immediate relative,has served in the U.S. military,
reserves, or national guard, with particular consideration given to those who served in
combat;
the person’s criminal history, including arrests, prior convictions, or outstanding arrest
warrants;
the person’s immigration history, including any prior removal, outstanding order of
removal, prior denial of status, or evidence of fraud;
whether the person poses a national security or public safety concern;
the person’s ties and contributions to the community, including family relationships;
the person’s ties to the home country and condition in that country;
the person’s age, with particular consideration given to minors and the elderly;
whether the person has a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent;
whether the person is the primary caretaker of a person with a mental or physical
disability, minor, or seriously ill relative; ;
whether the person or the person’s spouse is pregnant or nursing;
whether the person or the person’s spouse suffers from severe mental or physical illness;
whether the person’s nationality renders removal unlikely;
whether the person is likely to be granted temporary or permanent status or other relief
from removal, including as a relative of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident;
whether the person is likely to be granted temporary or permanent status or other relief
from removal, including as an asylum seeker, or a victim of domestic violence, human
trafficking, or other crime; and
whether the person is currently cooperating or has cooperated with federal, state or local
law enforcement authorities, such as ICE, the U.S Attorneys or Department of Justice, the Department ofLabor, or National Labor Relations Board, among others.
Question: Can I do this myself?

Answer: It is always possible, but it would be much better for you to obtain professional help. It is not easy to get this approved, but it is certainly possible if done properly.

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