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CNN: Trump Immigration Plan to Cost 4.6 Million Jobs, Ivy League Study Finds

CNN reports that a new study published by the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School found that the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act, would result in 4.6 million lost jobs by the year 2040. It also found that the U.S. economy would be two percent smaller than it would be under the current immigration policy during that time

Get Ready! Prosecutorial Discretions are being Revoked.

Question: I was in Immigration Court about 2 years ago and had no relief. However, I did not have any crimes either and my attorney made a motion for prosecutorial discretion. However, last week, I was arrested for DUI. I did not even have to plea as the case was dismissed. There was no evidence and I have no conviction. However, the arrest prompted ICE to revoke my Prosecutorial Discretion. What happens now?

Answer: Under U.S. immigration law, prosecutorial discretion (PD) refers to the power that ICE has to discontinue working on a deportation case. ICE can exercise its PD in many different ways. For example, ICE can join you in asking an immigration judge to close your case. Prosecutorial discretion used to be under Obama one of the most important aspects of Immigration Law. Immigration Prosecutors can choose not to prosecute a crime for which someone is arrested. They can decide to pursue less serious charges. They can basically decide not to issue the Notice to Appear and begin Removal Proceedings.

However, under Trump, this has changed. Prosecutorial Discretion is all but dead. It is very rarely being issued. There are, of course, situations where it is still merited, but nothing like before. Additionally, ICE is revoking grants of PD left and right. Therefore, it becomes necessary for you to know your rights.

You do not have to sign a voluntary deportation;
You can fight your case in front of the Immigration Judge; and
You can still get detained;
You can make a motion to get bonded out.

Therefore, you will note that ICE officials in many cases will not tell you the truth and will lie about what you can and cannot do. You MUST know that you can fight your case and the fact that the Prosecutorial Discretion was denied and/or revoked is no reason to give up. It just means you must fight your case now.

Question: But how can I fight? What should I do?

Answer: First, get a qualified Immigration Attorney. Each case is different. This means that depending on your situation, the particular forms of relief will be different. We might be able to apply for Cancellation of Removal or Adjustment of Status, or Waivers of a variety of different kinds, or Asylum, Withholding of Removal, Convention Against Torture or a number of other forms of relief. What is important is that you can fight your case. Simply because Trump has decided to issue orders revoking Prosecutorial Discretion does not mean your path has ended.

Immigration Attorneys across the country are fighting every order that Trump makes. He cannot simply make the Immigration and Nationality Act disappear, or the Code of Federal Regulations, or the Policy Memos or the Foreign Affairs Manual. We are a country of Laws and one man, even if President of the U.S., cannot simply dictate and make all of that disappear.

We are fighting one case at a time and ultimately, we will prevail and the tides will turn. Trump is already seeing through his Muslim Ban, that he cannot simply sign a paper and think it becomes law.

 

 

TRUMP revoking many PD Cases

The AssociatedPress reports that immigrants who received deportation orders but were allowed to stay in the United States under the Obama administration have become a target under President Donald Trump’s new immigration policies, with some getting arrested during check-ins with immigration officers. In other instances, immigrants with deportation orders have been released, much like they were during President Barack Obama’s administration, in what immigration attorneys say appears to be a random series of decisions based more on detention space than public safety.

TRUMP’s Budget aims for Massive Deportations

The proposed budget aims to dramatically increase immigration enforcement and border security funding to the tune of $300 million above current spending levels to facilitate the deportation of thousands of families and people who have strong ties to the United States and pose no threat to public safety. The proposed budget would also provide funds to increase immigration detention by 66 percent and hire an extra 500 Border Patrol officers and 1,000 additional ICE agents. Additionally, the budget also designates $1.6 billion to fun

Temporary Spending Bill Approved

Congress approved a stopgap bill to fund the government for another week. This bill will reauthorize the EB-5 Regional Center, Conrad 30 J Waiver, and Special Immigrant Non-Minister Religious Worker programs. Over the weekend, Congress will continue negotiating on a long-term spending bill, including President Trump’s request to fund his massive enforcement plan, including more detention beds and deportation agents.

Trump’s Immigration Crackdown Is Overwhelming a Strained System

The number of pending cases in immigration courts looks poised to grow as the Trump administration begins removing undocumented immigrants who weren’t previously targeted. AILA board member Jeremy McKinney explained that the 2014 migrant wave at the southern border first put a strain on the interior immigration courts

L.A. Police See Drop in Latino Reports of Crime amid Deportation Fears

Reuters reports that Latinos in Los Angeles have lodged 41 fewer reports of rape—down 25 percent—and 118 fewer domestic violence complaints—a 10 percent drop—since January 2017, compared with the same period in 2016, Police Chief Charlie Beck said on Tuesday. Those declines, coinciding with President Trump’s vow to step up deportations of undocumented immigrants, were not seen in the crime reporting of other ethnic groups. The trend suggests a growing mistrust of the criminal justice system among Latinos as the Trump administration has pressed state and local law enforcement to assist U.S. immigration agents, the Los Angeles Police Department stated

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