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New York Times: Whistle-Blowers Say Detaining Migrant Families ‘Poses High Risk of Harm’

The New York Times reports that as the Trump administration moves to expand family detention, two of the government’s own medical consultants sent a letter to the Senate’s Whistleblower Protection Caucus detailing a series of 10 investigations over the past four years that “frequently revealed serious compliance issues resulting in harm to children.”

Trump’s Crackdown on Students Who Overstay Visas Rattles Higher Education

The New York Times reports that effective August 9, 2018, the Trump administration plans to crack down on international students and visitors who overstay their visas, stoking fears in the higher education community that President Trump’s aggressive immigration policies will hinder university efforts to attract the brightest minds from overseas.

DHS Issues Waiver to Expedite Border Construction Project in New Mexico

DHS announced that it has issued a waiver that eliminates its “obligation to comply with various laws” in the vicinity of the U.S.-Mexico border, beginning at the Santa Teresa, New Mexico port of entry and extending 20 miles westward, in order to “ensure the expeditious construction of barriers and roads.” DHS published a notice of determination regarding the waiver in the Federal Register on January 22, 2018.

DACA District Court Ruling

A District court order in Regents of the University of California v. DHS, which directed DHS to maintain the DACA program on a nationwide basis on the same terms and conditions as were in effect before the September 5, 2017, rescission of DACA, including allowing DACA enrollees to renew their enrollments, with certain exceptions.

Claims About “Chain Migration” Are Not Accurate

a number of claims about the family-based immigration system made by elected officials and media pundits in recent weeks, debunking many of them. CBS News also fact checked President Trump’s recent characterization of the Diversity Visa Lottery program, explaining how the program actually functions

Is President Trump erasing all Immigration Laws from the Books?

Answer:  U.S. immigration law is very complex, and there is much confusion as to how it works. The Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA), the body of law governing current immigration policy, provides for an annual worldwide limit of 675,000 permanent immigrants, with certain exceptions for close family members. Lawful permanent residency allows a foreign national to work and live lawfully and permanently in the United States. Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are eligible to apply for nearly all jobs (i.e., jobs not legitimately restricted to U.S. citizens) and can remain in the country even if they are unemployed. Each year the United States also admits noncitizens on a temporary basis. Annually, Congress and the President determine a separate number for refugee admissions.

Immigration to the United States is based upon the following principles: the reunification of families, admitting immigrants with skills that are valuable to the U.S. economy, protecting refugees, and promoting diversity. This fact sheet provides basic information about how the U.S. legal immigration system is designed.

One President cannot simply ‘erase’ all the laws regarding immigration to create fear and to try to make political points. One such way to come into the U.S. is based on Family Immigration. Family unification is an important principle governing immigration policy. The family-based immigration category allows U.S. citizens and LPRs to bring certain family members to the United States. Family-based immigrants are admitted either as immediate relatives of U.S. citizens or through the family preference system.

Court Permanently Enjoins Restriction on Receipt of Federal Grant Money by Sanctuary Jurisdictions

In County of Santa Clara v. Trump, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued a nationwide permanent injunction against §9(a) of Executive Order 13768, which blocks so-called “sanctuary jurisdictions” from receiving federal grant money. District Judge William H. Orrick found the plaintiffs demonstrated that the executive order has caused and will cause them constitutional injuries by violating the separation of powers doctrine and depriving them of their Tenth and Fifth Amendment rights.

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