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Are you a Filipino Veteran of Word War II?

DHS issued a notice that it is creating a parole program to allow certain family members of Filipino and Filipino-American World War II veterans to receive parole to come to the United States. Announced as part of the November 2014 executive actions on immigration, this program may enable eligible family members to provide support, care, and companionship to their aging veteran family members who are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents. USCIS advised that it will inform the public once the application process is in place.

Immigration Reform and Parole Explanations

There are good changes on the horizon for Immigration Reform 2014

Immigration reform in 2014 has been issued. There are several items to Parole that are different, expanded and easier to get than in the past. Brian D. Lerner, immigration attorney explains that under immigration reform in 2014, first you would need to understand what exactly is ‘parole’ in order to have an appreciation of the differences.

 

At least three separate DHS memos address various aspects of “parole.” In the immigration context, parole refers to allowing an individual to temporarily enter the United States for purposes of significant public benefit or for humanitarian reasons without technically admitting the person into the country. Although parole is issued on a case-by-case basis, there is a long history of designated categories of individuals who may qualify for parole. “Advance parole” and “parole-in-place” are forms of parole. Advance parole refers to giving an individual currently residing in the United States in a temporary status permission to travel abroad for a short period and return to the United States without jeopardizing the existing status. Parole in-place is parole in which an individual who is already in the United States, but who is here without permission, is nonetheless granted parole without having to leave the country. Individuals granted parole—including advance parole and parole-in-place—may ultimately be able to gain lawful permanent status without leaving the United States, if they are otherwise eligible.

 

Brian D. Lerner states there are issues with this. For example, if somebody who might qualify under the immigration laws to adjust status in the U.S. – except for not being able to show legal entry, they might be able to use the parole. For example, they could qualify for DACA or DAPA under the immigration reform 2014, and because of that, they could apply for Advance Parole, leave the U.S. and then enter again legally. This legal entry would really be an admission to the U.S. states Brian Lerner. Because of that, the person could then adjust status in the U.S. assuming they have no other grounds of inadmissibility.

 

Here there is a specific change to immigration policy per the immigration reform 2014. Under direction from the Secretary of Homeland Security, DHS officials will be instructed to follow a 2012 immigration decision (Matter of Arrabally), finding that a lawfully present individual who travels abroad after a grant of advance parole does not trigger the three- or 10-year bars that ordinarily apply when a person departs the United States after residing here unlawfully for more than six months. Under this decision, individuals who would be eligible for LPR status but for the fact that their last entry into the United States was unlawful may be able to apply for permanent resident status upon their parole back into the United States. The new DHS instruction will ensure consistent application across the department. Assuming that this is actually followed, there will be consistency and a person leaving the U.S. under the immigration reform 2014, will be able to re-enter the U.S. without fear that they have just invoked the 3/10 year bar waiver. Brian Lerner states that prior to the immigration reform 2014, the adjudications of people re-entering the U.S. with the advance parole was inconsistent and different depending which officer you happened to get. Hopefully, this will end and there will be consistent adjudications.

 

Parole in Place adjudications has been expanded to include LPR relatives in the military as well as persons who intend to enter the military (not just personas already in the military.) Also, the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security has stated that he would like USCIS to grant deferred action to persons who overstayed their visas and who have a relative who is a veteran. Thus, the immigration reform 2014 in fact has good news on the horizon for parole and should be used once the regulations are issued.

President Obama’s Immigration Reform also deals with Parole in Place for the military and inventors

At least three separate DHS memos address various aspects of “parole.” In the immigration context, parole refers to allowing an individual to temporarily enter the United States for purposes of significant public benefit or for humanitarian reasons without technically admitting the person into the country. President Obama’s immigration reform changes somewhat the policy.  Although parole is issued on a case-by-case basis, there is a long history of designated categories of

individuals who may qualify for parole.

 

“Advance parole” and “parole-in-place” are forms of parole explains Brian D. Lerner. Advance parole refers to giving an individual currently residing in the United States in a temporary status permission to travel abroadfor a short period and return to the United States without jeopardizing the existing status. President Obama’s immigration reform also deals with  Parole-in-place. This is a type of parole in which an individual who is already in the United States, but who is here without permission, is nonetheless granted parole without having to leave the country. Individuals granted parole—including advance parole and parole-in-place—may ultimately be able to gain lawful permanent status without leaving the United States, if they are otherwise eligible.

 

Thus, Brian Lerner states that the PIP – Parole in place will be somewhat expanded.  Parole in place to protect military families  is where it will be expanded under President Obama’s immigration reform. Secretary Johnson announced new policies to protect unauthorized families of the U.S. military and of those seeking to enlist. In November 2013, DHS issued guidance permitting parole-in-place for unauthorized family members of military personnel and veterans. The new guidance will expand the availability of parole-in-place, as well as deferred action, to family members of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who seek to enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces. Under President Obama’s immigration reform, the Secretary also asked USCIS to consider granting deferred action to family members of current military personnel and veterans who have overstayed their visas.

 

A very interesting development according to Brian D. Lerner is that DHS officials will be instructed to follow a 2012 immigration decision (Matter of Arrabally), finding that a lawfully present individual who travels abroad after a grant of advance parole does not trigger the three- or 10-year bars that ordinarily apply when a person departs the United States after residing here unlawfully for more than six months. Under this decision, states Brian Lerner, individuals who would be eligible for LPR status but for the fact that their last entry into the United States was unlawful may be able to apply for permanent resident status upon their parole back into the United States. The new DHS instruction will ensure consistent application across the department. This might be a very good way for somebody to adjust status in the U.S. Brian Lerner explains that they could get the parole, come back into the U.S. and under certain circumstances adjust.

 

President Obama’s immigration reform also adds a completely new parole for investors, researchers, and founders of start-up enterprises. Brian Lerner states there are currently no new regulations on this, but USCIS has been directed to draft regulations for a new category of parole to enable certain inventors, researchers, and founders of start-up businesses to enter the United States before they become eligible for a visa. Parole would allow these individuals to temporarily pursue research and development of promising ideas and businesses in the United States, rather than abroad. Thus, President Obama’s immigration reform has lots of good news on Parole for differing categories of persons and hopefully will get the regulations issued soon

How many times can I re-enter the U.S. with one advance parole?

How many times can I re-enter the U.S. with one advance parole? – Avvo.com http://ping.fm/nqeTn

The Social Security Dilemma of Nurses

Question: I am a nurse and have just passed the NCLEX. I have a hospital who is more than willing to sponsor me. However, I have a big problem. In order to apply for the Green Card through the Nurse Petition, I need to have my unrestricted State License. Under normal circumstances people can get their license as soon as they pass the NCLEX. However, I cannot get my license without a social security number. I cannot get a social security number without a work permit. So, I am stuck. I am so close to getting the Green Card, yet not able to continue. Is there anything I can do?

ANSWER: Yes there is. This has been a considerable problem. It is a very unfortunate problem in that there is a severe shortage of nurses in the United States. Because of that shortage one would think that the INS regulations would not put up so many hurdles to bringing nurses into the country. The INS has finally seen this dilemma and now has created a solution.

Unfortunately the NCLEX is only offered inside the U.S., and therefore, it is necessary for many nurses who come here on visitor visas to take the NCLEX while in the U.S. However, while on a visitor visa, the nurse does not qualify for the social security number.

The irony of this is that these people would have to go back to their home country to take the CGFNS, wait outside the U.S. for over one year, and then come back in the country as a lawful permanent resident. The CGFNS does not mean that the nurse is licensed to practice nursing in the United States. Rather, it states that a nurse is likely to pass the NCLEX when she/he arrives in the United States. Once inside the U.S., then the nurse must take the NCLEX. Here is the irony. A person who has passed the NCLEX already, but cannot get the social security card had to go back to their home country to take the CGFNS in order to show that it was likely that they would pass the NCLEX.

Sometimes it is silly laws like this that prompt action to be taken. Now, the Immigration and Naturalization Service will accept a nurse petition upon presentation of a certified copy of a letter from the state of intended employment which confirms that the alien has passed the NCLEX examination and is eligible to be issued a license to practice nursing in that state.

QUESTION: Now that I know that I can submit the application for the Nurse Petition with proof of passing the NCLEX, when can I adjust my status to that of a lawful permanent resident?

ANSWER: Now, because you are immediately eligible to file the nurse petition, otherwise known as the I-140, you are also eligible to file for the adjustment of status simultaneously. This means that you can file both the I-140 nurse petition and the I-485 adjustment of status petition at the same time. You will get your temporary work permit in about 90 days and then be able to legally work while awaiting final approval on both the I-140 and the I-485 adjustment.

 QUESTION: Will I be able to leave the United States while I am awaiting the results of the I-140 and the I-485?

ANSWER: Yes. You can apply for what is known as Advance Parole. This will allow you to leave the United States while the petition is pending and to return without a problem.

This new regulation is most welcome. Hopefully, the INS will see other types of problems in the future and amend the regulations to ease the problems in applying for the visas.

What do I need to leave the U.S.?

Question: What is a Travel Document and Who Needs One?

Answer: If you are not a U.S. citizen, you may need permission to return to the United States after traveling abroad. This permission is granted through a travel document. Travel documents are also given to people who want to travel, but cannot get a passport from their country of nationality.

Question: How do I file for a travel document?

Answer: You must file USCIS Form I-131, Application for a Travel Document, complete with supporting documentation, photos and applicable fees. If you are a permanent resident or conditional resident, you must attach a copy of the alien registration receipt card; or if you have not yet received your alien registration receipt card, a copy of the biographic page of your passport and the page of your passport indicating initial admission as a permanent resident, or other evidence that you are a permanent resident; or a copy of the approval notice of a separate application for replacement of the alien registration receipt card or temporary evidence of permanent resident status.

Question: How can I file for Advance Parole?

Answer: If you are in the United States, you must show a copy of any document issued to you by the Service showing your present status in the United States; An explanation or other evidence demonstrating the circumstances that warrant issuance of Advance Parole.

If you are basing your eligibility for Advance Parole on a separate application for adjustment of status or asylum, you must also attach a copy of the filing receipt for that application.

If you are traveling to Canada to apply for an immigrant visa, you must also attach a copy of the consular appointment.

Question: Where should I file?

Answer: Where to file the Form I-131 depends upon the benefit sought. Thus, there is not only one single place to file.

Question: When should I File?

Answer: You must apply for the travel document before leaving the United States. Failure to do so may cause you to lose permission to re-enter the country, and lead to the denial of any other applications.

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