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The Supreme Court heard oral arguments on DACA

President Trump announced the end of DACA more than two years ago. Due to litigation, it is still in effect, and now the Supreme Court will have the final word. The Supreme Court heard arguments yesterday on 1) whether federal judges are able to review DACA, and 2) whether the way Trump went about ending DACA violated the law. The government argued that ending DACA falls within normal discretion, while plaintiffs argued the government’s ending of DACA violates the Administrative Procedure Act. The justices seemed split, though many justices kept their feelings close to their chest. A decision can be expected by summer.

Supreme Court to Hear Oral Arguments in DACA Termination Case

On Tuesday, November 12, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the administration’s decision to terminate DACA, the program that shields certain immigrants who were brought to the United States as children from deportation.

Supreme Court Conservatives Appear to Lean Toward Allowing Citizenship Question on Census

CNN reports that Supreme Court justices were deeply divided yesterday over whether the Trump administration can add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Five former directors of the Census Bureau, who have served under both Democratic and Republican administrations, filed an amicus brief in the case, stating that, “The longstanding view of the Census Bureau—reaffirmed by several recent Census Bureau analyses—is that addition of the [citizenship] question will reduce the accuracy of the population.”

USC Spouse denied due process because immigrant spouse denied a visa?

Supreme Court Holds U.S. Citizen Spouse Was Not Deprived of Due Process

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court vacated the Ninth Circuit’s decision in Kerry v. Dinand remanded. The plurality held that because the respondent, a U.S. citizen, was not deprived of “life, liberty, or property,” the government did not deny her any constitutional due process right when it denied her spouse a visa, and that the Due Process Clause did not require the government to explain its decision to deny the visa.

Supreme Court Finds Federal Tax Offenses Qualify as Aggravated Felonies

The Court found that convictions for tax violations under 26 U.S.C. §§7206(1) & (2) qualify as aggravated felonies, holding that the convictions involved fraud and deceit, and that tax crimes are not excluded from INA § 101(a)(43)(M)(i).

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