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Porting to a new Job?

The Second Circuit vacated the judgment of the district court and remanded, holding that USCIS is required by the INA’s portability provisions to give pre-revocation notice to the beneficiary or to the successor employer that it is revoking an I-140 petition filed by a previous employer.

Got a denied I-140? Maybe it can be reversed.

The Second Circuit vacated the judgment of the district court and remanded, holding that USCIS is required by the INA’s portability provisions to give pre-revocation notice to the beneficiary or to the successor employer that it is revoking an I-140 petition filed by a previous employer.

Portability Provisions cannot be used if original I-140 not valid

  1. The Eighth Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal, holding that the court lacked jurisdiction to consider whether USCIS failed to comply with disclosure requirements under 8 CFR §103.2(b)(16) when it revoked the plaintiff-beneficiary’s I-140 petition. The court also held that the plaintiff could not port his I-140 to subsequent employers, because the I-140 was not valid to begin with, as USCIS found numerous deficiencies in the petition submitted by the original employer. The court thus found that the plaintiff was not statutorily eligible to adjust status.

Can you deny an applicant in PERM because of lack of experience?

BALCA reversed the CO’s denial for failure to provide a sufficient explanation for rejecting eight U.S. applicants, noting that 20 CFR §656.17(g)(1) “does not indicate a level of specificity beyond what the Employer provided.”

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