The Ninth Circuit denied the petition for review, holding that the petitioner’s California conviction for second degree murder, based on an aiding and abetting theory, made him removable for having been convicted of an aggravated felony. The court found that California law on aiding and abetting, which looks to the natural and probable consequences of an act the defendant intended, had not materially changed since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Gonzales v. Duenas-Alvarez in 2007

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Court Says California Conviction for Second Degree Murder Based on Aiding and Abetting Theory Qualifies as an Aggravated Felony