Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

Los Angeles Immigration Attorney Let’s us know how he can help.

Question: Hello Mr. Lerner. Can you let us know as a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney how you help those in need?

Answer: Certainly. As a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney I get an opportunity to help persons from all over the world. Los Angeles attracts persons from Mexico, Canada, Europe, Russia and other countries. Even with the economy not doing so well, a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney is in a position to help people and their families.

Question: If someone is in deportation proceedings, how can you help?

Answer: First, as an Immigration Attorney in Los Angeles, I have specialized also as a deportation lawyer. Getting to the end of the process does take a great deal of work and time, but there is no greater satisfaction than when a Los Angeles Immigration Lawyer wins the case and gets for example Cancellation of Removal granted and a person who has been here illegal for 10 or 20 years now has lawful permanent residency and the green card and can stay in the U.S. without fear of deportation.

Question: Being a deportation attorney, what types of relief can you apply for in deportation proceedings.

Answer: Whether you are an Immigration Attorney from Los Angeles or an Immigration Attorney from New York or any other State, there are several forms of relief that can be applied for. Relief such as Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents, Cancellation of Removal for Non Permanent Residents. There are also asylum related relief that can be done. These are Political Asylum, Convention Against Torture and Withholding of Removal. As a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney, there are also forms of Adjustment of Status through either a family based immigration petition or an employment based immigration petition. Additionally, there are other forms of relief known as Registry, Battered Spouse Petition, Religious Petitions, Investor Petitions, Extraordinary Alien Petitions and so on.

Therefore, as you can see, just because you are in deportation proceedings does not necessarily mean that you will be deported. As a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney, with years of experience in deportation proceedings, and representing persons being put into deportation proceedings, there are many different ways to win.

Question: What if someone committed a crime and is now in deportation proceedings? Should they not be sent away?

Answer: As a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney, I have seen the heartache that accompanies people who are being torn away from their family and deported because of crimes many years ago. The majority of these people have committed crimes when they were young and foolish. Now, many cases where 10 or 20 years have passed, these people have changed and have families and jobs and are productive citizens. They have done their time in jail and payed their debt to society. Now, it would not be fair to rip them apart from their families if they have properly repaid their debts to society. Therefore, as a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney, I will do everything possible to help them stay in the U.S. and obtain residency.

Question: Any parting comments or anything you would like to say as a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney?

Answer: For those people who need help in deportation proceedings or any other area of immigration law, I will be happy to help. They can call toll-free to my office at 866-495-0554 and/or email me at blerner@californiaimmigration.us.

Question: I must get into the U.S. and have been denied at every corner. Is there anything I can do?

Answer: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) provides a number of humanitarian programs
and types of protection for individuals in need of shelter and/or aid from disasters, oppression,
emergency medical issues and other urgent conditions. Humanitarian parole is one such
program.

Humanitarian parole enables an otherwise inadmissible individual to enter the U.S. temporarily
due to a compelling emergency. USCIS may grant humanitarian parole based on urgent,
compelling reasons, or to promote a significant public benefit. This parole does not confer any
permanent immigration status, but does enable a recipient to apply for and receive employment
authorization.

Humanitarian parole is typically granted for the duration of the emergency or compelling situation
at issue. Anyone granted humanitarian parole must depart the U.S. prior to its expiration date or
risk negative immigration consequences. It is possible, however, to request while in the U.S., a re-
parole of a previously accorded humanitarian parole period.

Anyone can file an application for humanitarian parole, including the prospective parolee, a
sponsoring relative, an immigration attorney, or any other interested individual or organization. Requests for
humanitarian parole may only be accepted for individuals who are outside the U.S.; unless such
request pertains to a re-parole of a prior humanitarian parole granted at USCIS headquarters in
Washington, D.C.

Question: Where can I find the law about humanitarian parole?

Answer: The legal foundation for humanitarian parole comes from the Immigration and Nationality Act
(INA). Section 212(d)(5)(A) of the INA states USCIS has discretion to parole an individual into the
U.S. temporarily under certain conditions for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public
benefit on a case-by-case basis.

Question: Where do I file a request for humanitarian parole?

Answer: You file a request for humanitarian parole using Form I-131, Application for Travel Document,
with the Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, to:
Department of Homeland Security, USCIS
Attn: Chief, Humanitarian Affairs Branch
20 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 3300
Washington, DC 20529-2100

Question: How long does it take to adjudicate an application?

Answer: Humanitarian parole applications are generally adjudicated within 90-120 business days from
the time USCIS receives the application.

Question: How can I find out the status of my application?

Answer: To check the status of your application, contact the Chief of the Humanitarian Affairs Branch at
the above address. Please provide specific information about your application, such as the case
number of the humanitarian parole application, the name, and date of birth of the petitioner, the
date of application, and a brief explanation of the reasons for seeking parole.

Question: Can USCIS adjudicate humanitarian parole applications for individuals currently in the
United States?

Answer: Requests for humanitarian parole can only be accepted for individuals who are currently
outside the U.S. However, where USCIS Headquarters has already granted parole for
humanitarian reasons, an individual in the U.S. may file a request to for re-parole.

Question: How will I be notified if my request is approved?
Answer: If you are the applicant, you will receive a written notice when your application has been
adjudicated.

Question: For what period of time will I be granted humanitarian parole?
Answer: Humanitarian parole is typically granted for the duration of the emergency or compelling
situation at issue. It is seldom granted for longer than one year.

Question: Who can file an application for humanitarian parole?

Answer: Anyone can file an application for humanitarian parole, including the prospective parolee, a
sponsoring relative, an attorney, or any other interested individual or organization.

How can I get a Humanitarian Parole to get into the United States?

Question: What can I do if my case is not approved?

Answer: The denial of a request for humanitarian parole is a discretionary determination based upon a
complete review of all of the circumstances described in the documents submitted in each case.
The law does not provide for appeal of a denial. However, if there are significant new facts that are
relevant to your application for humanitarian parole, you may submit a new Form I-131 to the
address above with a new fee and supporting documentation.

Of course you need to be sure all medical documentation and any other supporting documentation for the Humanitarian Parole is submitted.

How can I get a Humanitarian Parole to get into the United States

Question: I must get into the U.S. and have been denied at every corner. Is there anything I can do?

Answer: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) provides a number of humanitarian programs
and types of protection for individuals in need of shelter and/or aid from disasters, oppression,
emergency medical issues and other urgent conditions. Humanitarian parole is one such
program.

Humanitarian parole enables an otherwise inadmissible individual to enter the U.S. temporarily
due to a compelling emergency. USCIS may grant humanitarian parole based on urgent,
compelling reasons, or to promote a significant public benefit. This parole does not confer any
permanent immigration status, but does enable a recipient to apply for and receive employment
authorization.

Humanitarian parole is typically granted for the duration of the emergency or compelling situation
at issue. Anyone granted humanitarian parole must depart the U.S. prior to its expiration date or
risk negative immigration consequences. It is possible, however, to request while in the U.S., a re-
parole of a previously accorded humanitarian parole period.

Anyone can file an application for humanitarian parole, including the prospective parolee, a
sponsoring relative, an immigration attorney, or any other interested individual or organization. Requests for
humanitarian parole may only be accepted for individuals who are outside the U.S.; unless such
request pertains to a re-parole of a prior humanitarian parole granted at USCIS headquarters in
Washington, D.C.

Question:  Where can I find the law about humanitarian parole?

Answer: The legal foundation for humanitarian parole comes from the Immigration and Nationality Act
(INA). Section 212(d)(5)(A) of the INA states USCIS has discretion to parole an individual into the
U.S. temporarily under certain conditions for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public
benefit on a case-by-case basis.

Question:  Where do I file a request for humanitarian parole?

Answer:  You file a request for humanitarian parole using Form I-131, Application for Travel Document,
with the Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, to:
Department of Homeland Security, USCIS
Attn: Chief, Humanitarian Affairs Branch
20 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 3300
Washington, DC 20529-2100

Question: How long does it take to adjudicate an application?

Answer:  Humanitarian parole applications are generally adjudicated within 90-120 business days from
the time USCIS receives the application.

Question:  How can I find out the status of my application?

Answer:  To check the status of your application, contact the Chief of the Humanitarian Affairs Branch at
the above address. Please provide specific information about your application, such as the case
number of the humanitarian parole application, the name, and date of birth of the petitioner, the
date of application, and a brief explanation of the reasons for seeking parole.

Question:  Can USCIS adjudicate humanitarian parole applications for individuals currently in the
United States?

Answer:  Requests for humanitarian parole can only be accepted for individuals who are currently
outside the U.S. However, where USCIS Headquarters has already granted parole for
humanitarian reasons, an individual in the U.S. may file a request to for re-parole.

Question:  How will I be notified if my request is approved?
Answer:  If you are the applicant, you will receive a written notice when your application has been
adjudicated.

Question:  For what period of time will I be granted humanitarian parole?
Answer:  Humanitarian parole is typically granted for the duration of the emergency or compelling
situation at issue. It is seldom granted for longer than one year.

Question: Who can file an application for humanitarian parole?

Answer:  Anyone can file an application for humanitarian parole, including the prospective parolee, a
sponsoring relative, an attorney, or any other interested individual or organization.

Question:  What can I do if my case is not approved?

Answer:  The denial of a request for humanitarian parole is a discretionary determination based upon a
complete review of all of the circumstances described in the documents submitted in each case.
The law does not provide for appeal of a denial. However, if there are significant new facts that are
relevant to your application for humanitarian parole, you may submit a new Form I-131 to the
address above with a new fee and supporting documentation.

Of course you need to be sure all medical documentation and any other supporting documentation for the Humanitarian Parole is submitted.

I am in Removal Proceedings but wife was sick on my interview date

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What are the options /consequences of LPR remaining outside the USA beyond the duration that a Re-Entry permit is granted – Immigration – Avvo.com http://ping.fm/qKZw0

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